Entries for the 'Security' Category

18

The struggle to provide safe drinking water in the face of the Gold King Mine spill is reminding many utilities and operators of the importance of knowing what to do if water service is disrupted. But creating a strong emergency plan is often easier said than done—and the middle of an emergency is the worst time to discover you’ve forgotten something.

Hosting a water emergency roundtable discussion is a great way to boost plans for service disruptions and help others in your community do the same. These events also provide a unique opportunity to connect water security with broader preparedness and community resiliency efforts underway in your region.

Here’s a quick glance at what you can do to host a successful discussion:

  1. Consult with partners within your water community to identify the groups that need to be at the table. Some groups to consider include hospitals, schools, farm operations, industrial parks, municipal pools, and first responders.
  2. Set a date and secure a meeting place that meets your meeting needs.
  3. Work with partners or co-hosts to ensure that the room has the equipment needed, such as a laptop, PowerPoint projector, and pens and pads for meeting participants.
  4. Have your water utility manager or superintendent call the groups to invite them to the event. A personal call typically results in a more positive response and can be followed by a formal invite and RSVP request.
  5. Call confirmed participants to outline what types of information participants will need to bring with them, how the discussion will be facilitated, and how sensitive information will be treated.
  6. Confirm with partners or co-hosts who will be responsible for facilitating the discussion, compiling participant data, putting together registration packets, welcoming participants, presenting, taking notes, and writing a meeting summary.
  7. Arrive at least on hour before the event is scheduled to set up materials and manage last minute details.
  8. Use meeting notes and discussed action items to develop a short report for participants.
  9. Write and distribute an internal and external report on progress towards action items approximately six months after the event.
  10. Determine the need for a follow-up meeting.

For more tips and sample invitation scripts, read the Water Emergency Roundtable—Outline for Discussion developed by the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators and EPA Region 5. 

14

Emergencies in the water industry happen every day. Your system may be able handle small events, but are you ready for the big one?

Do you have security procedures in place? Could you quickly handle unexpected hazards? Do you know where to find technical and financial resources to recover? WaterISAC can be one answer to many of these questions.

WaterISAC is a community of water sector professionals who share a common purpose: to protect public health and the environment. It serves as a clearinghouse to provide America's drinking water and wastewater systems with a source of information about water system security and with a secure Web-based environment for early warning of potential threats. Relying on information gathered from federal intelligence, law enforcement, public health, and environmental agencies, and from utility security incident reports, WaterISAC analysts produce and disseminate physical and cyber security information to the water sector.

How WaterISAC works:
WaterISAC analysts collect and review infrastructure protection information from government and private sources to share with members. Analysts tap into classified intelligence and open source information 24 hours a day to track security incidents across the world. Members are alerted increased risk of contamination, terrorism, or cyber threats so they can take quick action to reduce or prevent damage or injuries.

WaterISAC allows its members to be updated with news affecting water and wastewater operations through a regularly published e-newsletter prepared by a team of security experts. A threat notification is sent immediately in cases of imminent threats. Through confidential incident reporting, members can participate in protecting our critical infrastructure by confidentially reporting security breaches and suspicious activity.

WaterISAC offers two level of memberships, the WaterISAC PRO and WaterISAC Basic. A free 3-month PRO membership trial is offered to new members and the annual dues scale is sliding, based on population served. (For example, membership for most small drinking water systems would be $249 each year.) For more information about WaterISAC membership, you can visit their website.

For more water security resources, search our document database under the Water Security/Emergency Response category.

Posted in: Security
19

This video highlights the importance of developing a culture of security around your water or wastewater utility. While the case study presented serves a large community, EPA's "10 key features" approach can be applied to any size of system.

Posted in: Security, Videos
15

Ohio RCAP has been helping communities with mapping projects for several years. They've now formed a "GIS Cooperative" to share best practices as well as a new web application that the organization has developed.

The RCAP GIS Viewer is a custom interface that allows utilities to perform common data manipulations without being a GIS expert. The application helps the small system work with and have control over their data, supplementing the existing training and services provided by Ohio RCAP field staff. 

This approach allows the organization to serve even more communities in Ohio by providing an industry-customized, yet entry-level GIS solution. Utility personnel can quickly access and export key data in routine and emergency situations.

This brief video (below) introduces the Viewer. A longer walk-through can be found here

If you're new to GIS (i.e. Geographic Information Systems) and their role in water system management, you might also check out this slide presentation from Ohio RCAPFor questions, including Ohio communities interested in participating in the Cooperative, please contact Sherry Loos (smloos@wsos.org, 330-628-4286)

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